Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Hallandale Pre-Construction News -




Hallandale to vote on luxury condo tower planned for beach

A developer hopes to build a sleek 38-story luxury condo tower on the site of the former Regency Spa.

 


 

The modern 64-unit building would hug the shoreline, extending beyond the state-drawn boundary for most coastal construction. Developer Gilbert Benhamou is seeking permission from the city and state to build 135 feet east of the Coastal Construction Control Line, or CCCL.

 The project comes before commissioners on Wednesday. Approval from the state is expected within weeks.

 "If you look up and down the coast, virtually every building has had some portion of its development east of the CCCL," said Debbie Orshefsky, attorney for the developer. "This is just another piece."

 To get city approval, the developer plans to show the project will not adversely affect flooding in the surrounding area, she said.

 

Project location

 

 

Sun Sentinel -  April 2, 2014 

 

I did some research about this issue and came up with the following information: 


THE CCCL IS A JURISDICTIONAL BOUNDARY
 NOT A SETBACK LINE

The Coastal Construction Control Line Program (CCCL) is an essential element of Florida's coastal management program. It provides protection for Florida's beaches and dunes while assuring reasonable use of private property. Recognizing the value of the state’s beaches, the Florida legislature initiated the Coastal Construction Control Line Program to protect the coastal system from improperly sited and designed structures which can destabilize or destroy the beach and dune system. 

Once destabilized, the valuable natural resources are lost, as are its important values for recreation, upland property protection and environmental habitat. Adoption of a coastal construction control line establishes an area of jurisdiction in which special siting and design criteria are applied for construction and related activities. These standards may be more stringent than those already applied in the rest of the coastal building zone because of the greater forces expected to occur in the more seaward zone of the beach during a storm event.

Excerpts from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection guide to the CCCL


The purpose of the Florida Beach and Shore Preservation Act, pursuant to Parts I and II of Chapter 161, Florida Statutes (F.S.), is to preserve and protect Florida’s beach and dune systems. 
The Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) program, one of three interrelated components of the Statewide Beach Management Program, protects the beach and dune system from imprudent upland construction which could weaken, damage, or destroy the integrity of the system.  
The remaining two components contained in the Act are the Beach Erosion Control Program, which provides for the restoration and maintenance of critically eroding beaches, and the Joint Coastal Permit Program, which protects the shoreline from activities which could contribute to erosion, water pollution or habitat degradation. 
 


THE CCCL: A JURISDICTIONAL BOUNDARY - NOT A SETBACK LINE

Pursuant to Section 161.053, F.S., the CCCL is a line of jurisdiction, defining the landward limit of the Department’s authority to regulate construction. Control lines should not be confused with setback lines or lines of prohibition. New construction as well as additions, remodeling, and repairs to existing structures are allowed seaward of the control line; however, such structures and activities, unless exempt by rule or law, require a CCCL permit from the Department.

THE VALUE OF BEACHES AND DUNES


No other state and very few countries, if any, possess an abundance of high quality beaches as found in Florida. The 780 miles of sandy coastline are one of Florida’s most valuable natural resources. Florida’s beaches earn this status because they serve several important functions, each being vital to maintaining the health of Florida’s economy and environment.


The beach and dune system is home to hundreds of species of plants and animals which are dependent upon the beaches and dunes. For example, beaches are used by resident and migratory shorebirds for resting, foraging and nesting and during the summer months. Five species of endangered or threatened sea turtles come ashore to nest on the Florida's beaches. Over 30 animals considered rare within the state inhabit the beach and adjacent dune habitats. These plants and animals are adapted to living in the beach’s harsh environment of salt spray, shifting and infertile sand, bright sunlight, and storms.


Beaches are also home to humans. Florida’s beaches have attracted 15 million people to the state and 57% of Florida’s residents live within ten miles of the coast (State of the Coast Report, 1998). Both tourists and residents come to the beaches to relax and enjoy the sights and sounds of its natural beauty. Others visit the beaches to engage in boating, fishing, diving, and other recreations. Florida's beaches are an integral part of the state's economy, attracting tourists from around the world. Beach tourism generates about $15 billion a year to the state’s economy (State of the Coast Report, 1996).


The beach and dune system is the first line of defense against storms. It acts as a buffer between the storm waves and coastal uplands. During hurricanes, storm surges and waves encounter the beach and dunes before crashing into upland structures. When this happens, the sand making up the beach and dune system may be temporarily lost to the offshore bar system, reducing the damage suffered by upland property and structures.


THE PURPOSE OF THE CCCL PROGRAM


The CCCL Program is an essential element of Florida's coastal management program. It provides protection for Florida's beaches and dunes while insuring reasonable use of private property. In recognizing the value of the state’s beaches, the Florida legislature initiated the CCCL Program to protect the natural environment from improperly sited and designed structures which can jeopardize the stability of the beach-dune system, accelerate erosion, provide inadequate protection to upland structures, endanger adjacent properties, and interfere with public beach access and sea turtle nesting.  

Adoption of the CCCL establishes an area of jurisdiction in which special siting and design criteria are applied for construction and related activities. These standards are often more stringent than those applied in the rest of the coastal building zone. Construction closest to the beach is subject greater wind, wave and surge forces expected to occur in the more seaward zone of the beach during a storm event. 


Chapter 62B-33, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), provides the design and siting requirements for obtaining a coastal construction control line permit. 

Approval or denial of a permit application is based upon a review of the siting or location of structures relative their proximity to the beach and the potential impacts to the beach dune system, adjacent properties, native salt resistant vegetation, and marine turtles.  

While most permit requests are approved as submitted, some are modified during the permitting process.

Henry B. Nathan is a Hallandale & Hollywood Real Estate Agent

specialized in Pre-Construction Projects

 (800) 416-2747   (954) 296-6741

Email me: hbnathan@gmail.com

mentioning

  PRE-CONSTRUCTION CONDOS IN HOLLYWOOD

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